Spearfishing vs. Spear Phishing

While in Hawaii recently on vacation my millennial son tossed out a bucket list suggestion that we both go deep water Spearfishing. Immediately the iconic battle from the James Bond movie “Thunderball” leaped to mind. It’s the scene where the villain Largo’s minions in black wetsuits wage war against a platoon of US Navy Seals in red wetsuits. The whole sequence is fought with untethered spearguns and dive knives, safety first! Not one to back down from a challenge I arranged the dive and along the way we learned a few things worthy of sharing.

To further set the stage, back in 1992 I earned my PADI Open Water dive certification and have since made hundreds of dives, so pulling on a wetsuit, donning flippers, a mask and snorkel is nothing new, or so I thought. This was a 2mm one-piece wetsuit design which offered both thermal protection from the water as well as solar protection from burning exposed skin. The difference between this suit and my normal warm water one is that this one is decorated with an open water camouflage design. The purpose of the camouflage is to make the wearer look like a mass of seaweed to attack the smaller fish to the shade. The mask and snorkel are typical, but the fins were a whole different game. When spearfishing your objective is to not scare off the small fish which then alert the larger game fish. To do this you must minimize ALL your movements, including your kicks. Most of your time is spent drifting on the surface and lying in wait for your prey. Did I mention the chum, yes cut up bait fish are introduced into the water near where you’re drifting to draw in larger game fish, and sometimes sharks. Towards this end when spearfishing you use free diving fins which are nearly a meter long, three feet for my friends in the US. This enables the diver to make subtle ankle movements that gently propel them through the water.

When prey arrives the hunter slowly moves the one-meter long wood speargun from their side into a position in front of them. They then lock out their dominant arm holding the gun, support the stock with their free hand, and slowly scan left and right to ensure that no other divers are in harm’s way. Finally, the hunter aligns the gun with the target and squeezes the trigger. The bolt travels a maximum of five meters, with the optimum killing distance between three and five meters. Yes, you have to be very close to the fish, move with extreme care, and you have to make your only shot count. If your shot is true and you hit the fish solidly in the head then you’re instructed to drop the gun. Now there are a few caveats that I’ve not yet covered. The dive master instructed us to NOT shoot any fish that appears to be larger that 100 pounds. It turns out that connected to the back of the speargun is about 100 feet of floating line (1/2″ thick) that ends with a buoy. Divers can easily get tangled up in this line if they’re not careful while drifting. A 100-pound fish, with some room to run after being speared, can generate enough momentum to pull a fully grown diver under water, potentially resulting in their death. We were instructed that if a fish is in the area that is larger than 100 pounds, but less than 200 pounds, to slowly pass the gun to the dive master so they could then double check the area before taking a more experienced shot. Death from accidentally being speared, or dragged under by a fish, was represented as a very tangible threat. We had two spear guns, five divers, and five hours of hunting, and yet there was only one clear shot that proved fruitless. The fish felt the spear but it did not penetrate its skin because the spear had reached the end of the line attaching it to the gun as it touched the fish. So what does all this have to do with Spear phishing?

Phishing is the process of using emails containing malware designed to compromise the computer reading these emails. Spear phishing is the act of specifically targeting a single individual using a very custom crafted email and phishing attachment. While generic phishing attacks are often “spray and pray” based assaults, sometimes the employees of a given company or industry, spear phishing attacks are laser-focused on a single person. The attacker thoroughly researches their target, combing the web, social media and perhaps even doing some real-world social engineering and recognizance, to learn everything they can. The attacker’s objective is to select the most attractive strategy designed to elicit a response that results in the target opening an infected attachment. As in spearfishing, you may only get one shot so it has to be your best.

In both, the above cases the hunter thoroughly researches their prey looking for the most opportune places to hunt, the proper times, and the most alluring baits. They then choose the appropriate weapon, and thoroughly practice the use of that weapon to ensure that they can make it function properly with the single shot they might get on their target. They then select and distribute the proper baits, and lie in wait for their prey.

Something that is common and often overlooked is that in both Spearfishing and Spear Phishing the hunter is far more exposed, and hence significantly more vulnerable than they might be had they used ANY other method of attack. In Spearfishing the hunter is in the water only meters from his prey, and if they’re successful they need to move fast to land their catch on the boat before the arrival of sharks. A wounded fish instantly spills blood into the water and flails around in an effort to free itself. Sharks can detect blood in the water up to 1/3 of a mile away, and when they are near sense the electrical impulses from a fish’s muscles in distress and their splashing to zero in very quickly on what is now “their” prey. Sharks aren’t known for being discriminating eaters, so it is not uncommon at this point for the hunter to also become the hunted. In Spear Phishing if the attacker isn’t meticulous in covering their tracks during their research, social engineering efforts, bait selection (phishing email), and weapon design (phishing exploit used within the email) these can often be used to uncover their identity.

So be ever vigilant as you approach your email, there will be times when you’re only one click away from being speared, and your system becoming compromised!

One thought on “Spearfishing vs. Spear Phishing

Leave a Reply to Stacey Collins Cancel reply