As we move our performance focused applications to kernel bypass techniques like DPDK and Solarflare’s Onload this does not come without a price, and one component of that price is often security. When one bypasses the Linux kernel, they are also bypassing its security mechanisms (ex. XDP and NFTables, formerly IPTables). These security mechanisms have evolved over the past decade to ensure that your server doesn’t get compromised. Are they perfect no, software rarely is, but they are an excellent starting point to secure your Linux server. So as we move to kernel bypass platforms what options are available to us? We need to define lower level network security checkpoints that can be used as gatekeepers to keep the good stuff in and the bad stuff out. With one exception these are often hardware products that are managed using several different networking segmentation metaphors: micro, macro, and application which is also known as workload.

Micro-segmentation is the marketing term that has been co-opted by VMWare to represent its NSX security offering. When you’re a hypervisor company all the worlds a virtual machine (VM) so moving security into the hypervisor is a natural fit. VMWare then plays a clever trick and abstracts the physical network from the VM by installing a virtual network to which it then connects the VM. The hypervisor then works as the switch between the physical and virtual networks. To support coordinating workloads and security across multiple hypervisors running on different physical servers VMWare goes one step further and encapsulates traffic. This enables it to take traffic running on one virtual network and bridge it over the physical network to a virtual network on another host. So if your kernel bypass application can run from within a VM without having to rely on hypervisor bypass, then this model might work for you. Illumio has also attached itself to micro-segmentation, but rebranding it “smart micro-segmentation.” Our understanding is that they essentially run an agent that then programs NFTables in real time, so for kernel bypass applications this would offer no security.

Macro-segmentation, as you might guess, means creating segmented networks that span multiple external physical network devices. This is the term that Arista Networks has chosen (originally they used micro-segmentation, perhaps until VMWare stepped in). Macro-segmentation is the foundation for Arista’s CloudVision line of products. While this too does an awesome job of securing your network it doesn’t come without cost, which is complexity. CloudVision connects into VMWare NSX, Openstack and other OVS DB based controllers to enable you to seamlessly configure various vendors hardware through a single interface. Furthermore, it comes with configuration modules called configlets for a wide variety of hardware that enables you to quickly and easily duplicate data center functions across one or more data centers. It also includes a configlet builder tool to quickly empower an administrator to craft a configlet for a device for which one does not exist.

The last solution is application or workload segmentation. In techie terms, this is five-tuple filtering and enforcement of network traffic. Which to the layperson means opening the network packet up, inspecting the protocol it uses, along with the source and destination addresses and ports. Then taking these five values and comparing them to some collection of filter tables to determine the appropriate action to take on the packet. Today this can be done by Solarflare ServerLock NICs or applications like XDP or NFTables. ServerLock NICs do this comparison in 50 to 250 nanoseconds within the firmware of the NIC itself, entirely transparent to the server the NIC is installed in. In doing it this way the process of filtering consumes no host CPU cycles, is agnostic to the OS or applications running, and it scales with every NIC card added to the server. Packets are filtered at wire-rate, 10Gbps/port, and there can be one filter table for every locally hosted IP address with a total capacity exceeding over 5,000 filters/NIC. As mentioned, all of this filtering is done in the NIC hardware without any awareness of it by the DPDK or Onload applications running above it.

So if you’re using DPDK or Onload, and the security of your application, or the data it shares, is of concern to you, then perhaps you should consider engaging with one of the vendors mentioned above.

If you’d like to learn more about ServerLock, please drop me an email.